Frau Wirtin

This topic contains 8 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  SEastman 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #31386 Reply

    SEastman
    Participant

    I wonder if anyone can help me with this subcollection of modern steins. I bought one of these some years ago and used it at the Bayou Stein Verein meeting at that time. The German speaking members of the club were quite stumped at translating it and gave some wild guesses. Later I tracked it down myself, and I have been buying individual steins in this “series” one at a time over the years. Unfortunately two so far have arrived broken, as they are not very expensive and turn up with inexperienced ebay sellers.

    The steins each illustrate a song in the huge series of songs about Frau Wirtin. I have bought a book with 958 of these verses, also a CD with a number of them sung, and a 33 recording of some. The songs were begun by students in the old student societies, the first by Goethe himself, and students kept adding more. The closest thing in English to these songs would be the naughty limerick. They don’t translate well.

    The steins are by Gerz during the W. Germany period. They are .5 litre and mostly lidless.

    So, I have two questions about them. Does anyone know how many there are? Perhaps there is a Gerz catalog with them, or a book with this series of illustrations? And second, has anyone ever seen a Frau Wirtin theme or illustration on a classic or older stein?

    https://www.facebook.com/508355862525392/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1624543940906573

  • #31388 Reply

    Ron

    I don’t know what happened to Stuart’s reply, just his name replaced your name.

    What a great find for you. I can’t help you on the Gerz series. That company went bankrupt and Domex bought their name and some molds. You might try contacting them to see if they are still being made.

    I did find an old stein that you might be interested in. Matthais Girmscheid molds 84, 159, 180, 947 and 980 has the following verse: “Es zogen drei Burschen wohl über den Rhein, bei einer Frau Wirtin, da kehrten sie ein.” (There were three young men who traveled across the Rhine, and with a lady tavern keeper they rested.) Text is taken from a song entitled “Der Wirtin Töchterlein” (The Innkeeper’s Daughter), written in 1809 by Ludwig Uland. You can try searching it on Google to obtain more information.

  • #31412 Reply

    SEastman
    Participant

    That was me. I ask questions as well as answer when I can. Thanks for the note on the other poem. It’s quite different, and quite awful. I don’t know if there is some early connection. Steintalk isn’t too crowded but maybe someone will come along who has more to say.

    • #31414 Reply

      Ron

      Stuart.

      Sorry about that, I saw it initially on my phone and when I saw the Reply to: Frau Wirtin I thought that was who was asking the question. Did you try to contact http://www.domex.de/startseite/?

    • #31419 Reply

      John Piet

      Stuart,
      You steins remind me of things you can find for sale in the U.S. at truck stops or Ozark gift shops. Why don’t you put a few of the less risque ones together for an article in Prosit. I have a German friend that is very good at translating obscure German text for me if you need some help. For anyone reading these posts, “Frau Wirtin” does not refer to a specific person, but to any lady innkeeper or hostess.

    • #31501 Reply

      SEastman
      Participant

      I’m trying to organize some notes and will see how they turn out. In this particular song/genre Frau Wirtin does refer to a particular lady innkeeper of a particular inn. While I call the song(s) Frau Wirtin because of the first line of a thousand or so verses, the proper name of the song is “Es steht ein Wirtshaus an der Lahn”. Apparently the Inn is still standing, a cultural heritage site, and folklorists have a fair amount to say about the song(s).

    • #31533 Reply

      Ron

      Stuart,

      This may not be a suitable article for Prosit.

    • #31708 Reply

      SEastman
      Participant

      I have a short article. I’m going to bring it to some folks at the Deutsches Haus to see if anyone can help with the translations. It’s not the words, it’s the poetry, allusions, slang, etc. that make it so difficult. At least the lettering is easy. I know I can’t really translate it properly but I want to make sure it’s not wildly wrong. Then I’ll send it to you to look over.

  • #34352 Reply

    SEastman
    Participant

    Don’t think I’ve given up or forgotten about this subject. I keep going on stein subjects for years!
    I have another in my collection now, and am still looking for more.

    Translation of the verses seems difficult or impossible. You can translate the words but the slang meanings, whatever they are, seem lost. Germans don’t want to help because they are either too old and stuffy or else they are too young to know the old song. But I’m still working on it.

    But here is my question for today: Upon very close inspection it turns out that all these steins’ illustrations are signed. But it’s not a full name. They are signed “Lojo”, or so it looks, which can be either a first or last name for men or women. Has anyone encountered anything about an illustrator/artist/cartoonist active in Germany in the 70’s named or nicknamed “Lojo”?

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