Regimental Stein – Input please Ron? John?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Wiking44 5 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #27100 Reply

    Wiking44
    Participant

    This stein is a going away gift from a soldier to a Lieutenant. On the lid it says (roughly): “From loyal lad Thormann in fond remembrance of First Lieutenant Kriebitzsch Harbg., Sept. 1900” I do not know what the Harbg stands for. There is a chance that it might be Hambg (which would perhaps mean ‘Hamburg’)

    It has an infantry theme with an anchor and a 9th Regiment emblem. I’ve looked at the Imperial German Army organization for 1900 and it shows the 9th Regiment (2nd Pomeranian) Colberg Grenadiers “Count Gneisenau” as being stationed at Stargard in Pomerania. However, there are other units in the Imperial Army – for example – 127th (9th Wuerttemberg) Infantry that have the ‘9th’ designation in their name. Is there a rule or guideline as to what is put on the stein from a unit designation standpoint?

    Also, the stein has a couple of small parts painted over the emblem…namely the ribbon at the bottom and the ‘dot’ on the unit tab. I cannot read the mark on the bottom, even under magnification.

    Thoughts?











  • #27101 Reply

    Ron

    Wiking44,

    This is not an actual reservist stein since it lacks the name, service time and roster. This is probably Marzi & Remy mold 992 which can contain various designs. Do you have a photo showing the top of the handle? If it is black or possibly brown, it is a M&R stein. It looks like somebody may a touched up the brown rings. If you can penetrate the paint with a pin, it is repainted. If you can’t, it is fired on and left the factory that way. The unit is Schleswig-Holslteinsches Pionier (engineer) Bataillon Nr. 9 garrisoned at Harburg a.E. It is part of the Imperial German Army. The anchor is a clue that it is a pionier unit. The name on the bottom is probably the person that did the engraving and maybe the design on the stein. Did you try to look up the name on SteinMarks?

  • #27102 Reply

    Wiking44
    Participant

    Great information Ron. I knew it wasn’t a reservist stein. Wasn’t sure what to call it. Presentation stein perhaps? Thank you so much for taking the time to look at this and provide me your valuable insight. It does look like the paint was touched up, but when I check it with a pin as you suggest it does not penetrate. In fact, it’s very clear that the glaze is covering all of the paint. Have you seen other steins with ‘sloppy’ lines like this before?

    I have looked a little on SteinMarks but as you know there is a lot of information there to go through…and I don’t even know where to start because the mark is all but indecipherable.

    Here are some pictures of the handle.


    • #27103 Reply

      Ron

      Wiking44,

      M&R used to paint the top of the handle under the thumblift black. That is why they are referred to as “black-handled” M&R. Sometimes they were painted a different color, brown in this case. These steins were hand painted, so it is not unusual to find imperfections. The imperfections will vary depending on the firm’s quality control standards. Mettlach had tight quality control standards, so you will find fewer imperfections and they tend to be less sloppy than those found at other firms. You can refer to this stein as being a military stein.

      Look on SteinMarks using the initials. It looks like it might be a W. H.

  • #27104 Reply

    Wiking44
    Participant

    I looked more closely and it’s actually a W & B… which is Wieseler & Beeri

    Wieseler and Beeri

    “Süddeutsche Glasmanufaktur”

    • #27105 Reply

      Ron

      Wiking44,

      Great, now can you make out the other objects on the front of the stein? I see crossed rifles, a spade and an anchor. I can’t make out the object at the top. Amazing what all you can find if you just start asking yourself questions.

  • #27106 Reply

    Wiking44
    Participant

    Yes, there is the backpack, a short-sword (could be bayonet but it’s got a guard on the handle), the crossed rifles, the shovel, the anchor, and an axe. 🙂

    Pretty cool. Again I thank you for taking the time to share and help teach me.

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