Walt

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  • in reply to: Pitcher used by Hitler? #42822

    Walt
    Keymaster

    Ruthie, linking to a photo on your own computer is not going to work.

    Although your post so far does not show any basis for suggesting the pitcher was used by Hitler, that is extremely unlikely, and in the absence of clear documented provenance will not add value to the item.

  • in reply to: Help Stein ID and value #42536

    Walt
    Keymaster

    I am reluctant to try to place a value on your stein primarily because I do not collect this type. As I mentioned, the chip is pretty distracting, so value will be modest. Other collectors do watch this forum, so perhaps one of them who is interested will venture a value.

  • in reply to: Help Stein ID and value #42385

    Walt
    Keymaster

    This stein is for the 23rd Infantry Regiment, 6th Company, garrisoned in Saargemunde. It is a Bavarian Regiment (lion, white and blue). The Reservist served for two years instead of the normal three, so he was apparently a volunteer or had a special skill which entitled him to a shorter period of service. I have to believe that the photo portrait is of the soldier himself.

    Infantry regimentals are the most common branch of service, and Bavarian the most common of the infantry. Unless I miss something special about the stein, it is not worth a lot of money even in perfect condition, and the highly visible rim chip further detracts from its value.

    Assuming this is indeed a portrait of your great grandfather, I urge you to keep it as a family treasure. It is irreplaceable to you.

  • in reply to: Stein ID help #42099

    Walt
    Keymaster

    It also looks like it might have a Stanhope, a glass rod which has a photo glued to one end. If in fact this looks like a glass rod, try looking through it to see if there is a scene.

  • in reply to: Hoffmann engraved beer stein #41713

    Walt
    Keymaster

    Was your grandfather named Jacob? Jacob had a brewery in New York. Philip? Philip owned a brewery in Kingston NY. Knowing more about the brewery would enhance interest among collectors.

  • in reply to: Huge Beer Stein, 39 L #40352

    Walt
    Keymaster

    Here are eight photos I received from francatan.

    a pair of 32L Gerz and pair of 12L King Werk steins in francatan's personal collection;
    a pair of 32L Gerz and pair of 12L King Werk steins in francatan’s personal collection

    pair of 32L Gerz and 1 12L King Werk nearer vision
    pair of 32L Gerz and 1 12L King Werk nearer vision

    39L Girmscheid stein close to pair of 32L Gerz in a Germany stein shop (photo very old)
    39L Girmscheid stein close to pair of 32L Gerz in a Germany stein shop (photo very old)

    39L Girmscheid stein glazed salt beige color no more manufactured.
    39L Girmscheid stein glazed salt beige color no more manufactured.

    a pair of 32L Gerz and pair of 12L King Werk of my personal collection
    Girmscheid 24L close to a Gerz 32L – steins with lids

    pair of 32L Gerz and 1 12L King Werk nearer vision
    Girmscheid 24L close to a Gerz 32L – steins without lids

    39L Girmscheid stein close to pair of 32L Gerz in a Germany stein shop (photo very old)
    Girmscheid 24L close to a Gerz 32L – another view

    39L Girmscheid stein glazed salt beige color no more manufactured.
    Girmscheid 24L close to a Gerz 32L – just the lids

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Walt.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Walt.
  • in reply to: Help w/Identifying steins #40216

    Walt
    Keymaster

    The first stein (tavern scene) was apparently made in 1902 to celebrate wedding anniversary. The second (miner) is modern, and the most appealing thing about it is the lid. The third and fourth steins are both old, circa 1890-1900,and both have modest appeal to collectors. The first one is more attractive, the second has the GK signature which will attract some collectors. Retail value is likely #1-$25-$35, #2-$10, #3-$25, #4-$15-$20.

  • in reply to: Cleaning steins #40169

    Walt
    Keymaster

    See “Caring for your Steins” in the Reading Room.

  • in reply to: Couldn't find this makers mark. See pics of 2 steins #40157

    Walt
    Keymaster

    They are old (circa 1900) but do not have a lot of appeal to collectors of old steins. Best bet is to list them on eBay with no reserve.

  • in reply to: Couldn't find this makers mark. See pics of 2 steins #40152

    Walt
    Keymaster
  • in reply to: German Beer Mug pre WWII #40049

    Walt
    Keymaster

    Can you at least describe it? Your best bet is to post photos on the Internet and link to them from here. See directions here http://stein-collectors.org/how-to-place-photos-in-steintalk/

  • in reply to: Stein appraisal #40032

    Walt
    Keymaster

    Dennis, no one will be able to help you unless you provide photos.

  • in reply to: What is this? #39431

    Walt
    Keymaster

    30-40 years ago when I started collecting I asked an experienced collector how to tell how old a stein was. He told me, “You look at it and you know.” That wasn’t very helpful, but as years have passed I came to appreciate what he said. He did go on to show me various traits that when taken together reveal the age. Pewter is a big tell, and the fly-away angle of the thumblift on this stein is recognizable as being comparatively new. The details of the relief are not sharp. The colors are typical tourist fare. I can’t see the base, but suspect it is marked as “Western Germany.” The terms Handgemalt and Handarbeit, both meaning handmade, are dead giveaways – 100 years ago these markings didn’t exist. As you noted on your blog, your own college beer stein may be important to you, but it is unlikely to hold the same value for someone else. That is an important element in determining value of all beer steins – the stein you bought on your honeymoon in Munich has special meaning to you, but to someone else it is just a souvenir. The stein in question does not display any characteristic that distinguishes it from hundreds or thousands of others, and very similar steins can be purchased brand new in souvenir shops at reasonable prices. And steins with no distinguishing features can be picked up at garage sales.

  • in reply to: What is this? #39427

    Walt
    Keymaster

    This is post-war gift shop fare, worth perhaps $10 to someone who wants it for decoration purposes.

  • in reply to: Help w/Identifying steins #40511

    Walt
    Keymaster

    There are some amateurish pewter engravings perhaps done with a Dremel which detract from an otherwise attractive stein, but by and large the engraving on a lid does not affect value one way or the other. Personally, I like the personalization which often sheds light on the meaning of the stein to the original owner.

    Regarding GK – some things remain a mystery 120+ years later. See
    http://www.steinmarks.co.uk/pages/pv.asp?p=stein485

    Years ago I asked a knowledgeable collector how to tell if a stein was old or not. His answer was quite disappointing—”You just look at it.” Over the years as I gained knowledge, his statement has become much more sensible to me. What I mean by that is that I no longer have to look for specific clues, the answer is apparent. The style, particularly the coloration of the King Gambrinus stein is not the sort of things being produced today. No company today would produce a stein that does not show their corporate identity on the base. The base and the body of the stein both show marks accumulated over years of being both used and passed from owner to owner. The pewter of the lid is nicely patinated.

    I hope this helps.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 110 total)