Help Identifying Stein

This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Walt 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #58654 Reply

    John May

    We Inherrited a few steins and I’m just trying to get more information on them. This one looks the oldest to me. They came from my father in law who lived in Germany as a kid in the 40s and was also stationed there during Vietnam. We are not sure when he aquired them, but my wife says they were around her entire life.

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/FKjSzEPCxQ775y2h8

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/yqTx1wzFQrnQ5FuF7

  • #58660 Reply

    Bill G
    Participant

    John, the 1906 date engraved on the lid is a pretty good sign of the age of the stein. If there is a number on the bottom it might help one determine what maker used the transfer on the blank body.

  • #58661 Reply

    Walt
    Keymaster

    It’s unlikely that you will find a number on the bottom or that the manufacturer can be identified, because the majority of porcelain firms did not mark their steins. It’s common for steins of this type to have a lithophane in the base. You can check by holding the base of the stein toward a light source and looking through the inside at the bottom. There’s an article about lithophanes in the Reading area of this site.

  • #58665 Reply

    John May

    Nothing on the bottom of this one. I’ll check the bottom for light when I get a chance. Someone translated it as saying Christmas 1906 graf Holnstein. Best I can tell Holnstein was a fairly important guy so I’m thinking maybe it was custom made for that family or something. This has sent me down a pretty fun rabbit hole honestly. I wish my father in law was still around to ask him how and where he aquired it. Thanks for the responses tho, much appreciated!

  • #58669 Reply

    Walt
    Keymaster

    Maximilian von Holnstein was an important and interesting person, but he died in 1895. The engraving on the lid suggests that the stein was owned by his successor as Graf, most likely given as a Christmas gift. This inscription makes a relatively “common” stein more interesting, but does little to increase its value.

  • #58672 Reply

    John May

    Thanks Walt, I’m not interested in selling anyways, it’s all my wife has that was her fathers. It’s just been fun researching these things.

  • #58673 Reply

    Walt
    Keymaster

    Agreed. It’s surprising how much historical info can be pulled out of these steins if we look hard enough.

Reply To: Help Identifying Stein
Your information: