Trying to identify large stein

This topic contains 6 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Steve Proud 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #53906 Reply

    Steve Proud

    Hi,
    We are trying to identify a large stein – height 18.5″ (47cm) with a base diameter of 6″ (15cm). It has a pewter lid with a monk figure on the handle. The material seems to be a white clay and the colour is a uniform green. The large size suggests it may have been intended for serving beer. There are no maker’s or other marks on the plain base.

    Pictures are at:
    https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=2900451853537444&set=pcb.2900452286870734

    and
    https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=2900451816870781&set=pcb.2900452286870734

    Any information would be very welcome.
    Many thanks,
    Steve

  • #53910 Reply

    Ron

    Steve,
    I would judge the stein to be about 4 L in capacity based on the dimensions you provided. I did find another green stein, https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Large-Ceramic-The-Green-Moorland-the-Hunters-Joy-Fox-Handle-Stein-/273593278311?_ul=IL. It is marked MR 722 on the bottom, but it is not made by Marzi & Remy. It is the same as Girmscheid 1032. They redid that stein in the 1960s without the figural lid.

    Does your stein have any German verse on it? A mold number under the handle? Initials for an artist? These could help in searching for your stein’s maker.

    Regardless, the damage on your stein significantly reduces its value. Repair would be expensive and still would not equal that of one in mint condition.

  • #53911 Reply

    Steve Proud

    Ron,
    Many thanks for the information. I’ve just had another look at the stein in the places you mentioned but it seems to be devoid of any markings. There is lettering around the edges of some of the coats of arms depicted on it, but much of the lettering is indistinct. At a guess, I’d say the inscriptions are in Latin, rather than German but the longest letter groups I’ve been able to read have been five or six letters long. Compared with other steins we’ve looked at on line, it seems to be relatively plain and unsophisticated – which could mean it was a very basic item for day to day use or possibly quite old. If anything, the pewter lid is far more ornate than the pot itself.
    The damage is a shame but that’s the condition it was in when we bought it at a local sale. The existing repair is evidently not a professional one but proper restoration costs would probably exceed the value as you suggest.
    The 4L capacity you mentioned is interesting; the dimensions seemed to be larger than most we’d seen on line and it looks too big to be used as a drinking vessel, so it could have been used for serving purposes.
    Many thanks again for the reply.

    • #53912 Reply

      Ron

      Steve,
      Can you post more photos of the stein?

    • #53980 Reply

      Steve Proud

      Ron,
      My apologies for not replying sooner – much refurbishment work at home has taken up so much time. I’ve added more photographs as you suggested, though there isn’t a lot of detail on the stein.

      https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2907938496122113&set=pb.100007179728200.-2207520000..&type=3

      I hope this link to all the photos works – I’m not that familiar with posting on Facebook.
      If you have more insight into the likely origin of the stein, it would be much appreciated, but please don’t spend much time on it; the extent of the damage makes the stein of little value really.
      Kind regards,
      Steve

    • #53982 Reply

      Ron

      Steve,

      I can make out the word Sclavonia around the circle surrounding the Wappen showing the double-headed eagle. The other Wappen shows rampant lions with crowns. The crown probably indicates a state rather than a city. The mother and child may be a religious symbol.

      Sckavonia was a region of Slavonia, now part of Croatia. Maybe someone from that area can help you idenify that wappen for you.

      The circles on the bottom of your stein indicate it was thrown on a potter’s wheel, probably a small firm. The Munich Child thumblift indicates it was intended for the Munich market.

      That should give you enough leads to occupy you when you complete your refurbishment project.

  • #54000 Reply

    Steve Proud

    Ron,
    Many thanks for that further information. This has sparked more interest and I’ll be doing some more research once our work here is done.

    Thanks again,

    Kind regards,
    Steve

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