SEastman

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 57 total)
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  • in reply to: Hofbrauhaus stein #36790

    SEastman
    Participant

    It is, as you note, a Hofbrau Haus stein. It is the basic stoneware stein that has been made for a century or more. Unless markings on the bottom or side indicate it is a particularly old one it is for drinking beer and remembering your visit to the Hofbrau Haus rather than being a valuable item for collecting. The most typical sizes are 1/2 liter and 1 liter marked near the handle. If it is not marked it is likely to be a very modern one for the American market.


  • SEastman
    Participant

    I disagree. While most members here only collect classic, pre-war steins, there are many people who do appreciate the better of the modern steins. The one of the castle is a good example, and the one with the wolf finial isn’t bad. They won’t bring as much as a classic stein but they will bring a price. The 70’s is starting to be a long time ago, really, even though it seems like yesterday to many collectors.
    As for the AVon steins though, those you will probably have to give away. That’s what they were made for, really, so they might as well keep serving the purpose. Non-collectors often like them.

  • in reply to: Inherited Steins #36721

    SEastman
    Participant

    Chuck,
    In general, if you want information about a stein start a new thread and include a photo of the stein (or more).
    However, as your stein was marked Western Germany, it was made in the 1970’s. Also, it does not have a manufacturer’s mark it was not one of the better known brands. That’s about all there is to say about it, although the soldiers’ uniforms would be something to talk about if there were good photos. It is not worth much though. Check out similar items on ebay for reference.

  • in reply to: Need help identifying this stein please! #36708

    SEastman
    Participant

    Someone more expert will probably answer this; but, in my opinion it looks like a German Faience stein and from 1775-1825 from the pewter fixtures. I don’t know values for these. KW does not show up in steinmarks but not everything does.

  • in reply to: What do I have? #36686

    SEastman
    Participant

    Well, they are modern (post war) souvenir steins. One is a music box stein. One doesn’t have a lid. That’s what you have. They are no doubt of sentimental value to you but they have very little market value (at least the ones in the photos.

  • in reply to: Help Identify this Stein #36685

    SEastman
    Participant

    The Schnitzelbank stein was made for American Bravo Company of California but it was made by an unknown maker in Germany. The red glass one appears to be a modern SCI convention stein.

  • in reply to: HB Stone stein with Zinn lid #36418

    SEastman
    Participant

    These steins are for drinking and as souvenirs rather than being particularly valuable. Because it has a paper sticker saying zinn (=tin, =pewter in German) I deduce it is a modern stein. Beer drinkers like these steins a lot; but, collectors not so much because they make and sell so many of them.

  • in reply to: Info on Steins acquired at auction #36405

    SEastman
    Participant

    This site and many of the links have a lot of information on steins. You should use them. The care information includes basically just rinsing them in lukewarm water rather than using anything hot or harsh. If you can’t find a stein described anywhere, post links to online photos of the top, bottom (!), both sides, and any numbers or trademarks you see and someone here might help. They look like nice steins from the group shot, especially the one on the left.

  • in reply to: Old stein #36224

    SEastman
    Participant

    Photo’s might help but probably not. Pewter and silver marks are complex and a different specialty. Do you have reason to believe it is a German stein?

  • in reply to: Schierholz Character Stein symbolism #36221

    SEastman
    Participant

    I’m not sure what you are asking. The beer stein library pretty much says it all. There must be dozens of articles here discussing the Munich Child as well. The cat shows up often as a symbol of a hangover, as does the herring as the cure for a hangover. Those are the only symbols that I see, unless it is one with a lithophane.

  • in reply to: Date this stein? #36195

    SEastman
    Participant

    Note that the hinge has a shank lifting it up from the handle toward the lid. This style dates the stein to after 1865. Also note that thumblift is not over the hinge but over the lid itself. This old style was used mainly before 1875 when the thumblift became more commonly directly over the hinge. So the stein is probably from around 1870. The lack of a liter mark also points to about 1870 or earlier.

  • in reply to: Thewalt Stein Lamp #36188

    SEastman
    Participant

    and Western Germany is usually on steins from the early 1970’s. But it varies.

  • in reply to: Thewalt Stein Lamp #36182

    SEastman
    Participant

    Steins and similar marked West Germany are usually from the late 1970’s to 1990.
    While this type of pottery is common, I don’t often see lamps. Some stein collectors like items like that as go-withs for their collection. Don’t expect a high value though…

  • in reply to: Pass Stein sayings #36007

    SEastman
    Participant

    Now I have a new one in my subcollection. It is a three handled 1 liter pass stein from Rastal. The three handles are arranged to leave room for an illustration, in this case of a Russian Spiny Wolpertinger.

    “Russischer Stachel-Wolpertinger”
    lat. wolpus spiculum ex oriente

    The many and varied wolpertingers of Bavaria are well known, and they are cousins to the American Jackalope. But, I have never before heard of a Russian Spiny Wolpertinger and would be glad of any suggestions as to why one wound up on a three handled pass stein.

    https://www.facebook.com/pg/Bayou-Steinverein-508355862525392/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1857965697564395

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 11 months ago by  SEastman.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 11 months ago by  SEastman.
  • in reply to: Where to Start Reading? #35995

    SEastman
    Participant

    You will not find a shortage of steins with fables and historic scenes. For some reason the fables are mostly on classic period steins rather than modern ones. There are quite a few historic scenes on modern ones though, generally commemorating some anniversary or other. Ebay is great for finding that sort of stein; but, they may not be described as such so you may have to examine the photos and interpret the scene.

    If you like proverbs, there is an even larger number of steins featuring proverbs. Perhaps even most of them.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 57 total)